Transitions: Film to Digital By: Anthony Cohen

TransitionsMy first real camera was a 1980 Canon AE-1, I was 18 and in my first semester of college when I entered my first dark room. After only a week I experienced the magic of an image materializing on the page for the first time. I never looked back. Nothing is better then blasting some music chilling out and processing film after work.

If you have ever made the transition from film to digital, you lose some of the magic. Digital media is amazing; a marvel of modern technology; you get to take photos lightning fast and review them instantly. These are major bonuses but the finality of clicking the shutter is gone and photography becomes less special.

That is when I received my second real camera a Sony a5100. To be honest I bought it for its amazing video, and have moved up through the line buying a Sony a6000 and a Sony a7s.  When I first got into video production I noticed some of the old magic coming back you have that one chance to capture a moment perfectly you can try an recreate it but its never exactly the same. You might argue that its the same way with digital photography, but I feel it more when I am filming something. From the calculated and controlled click of the record button to the hours it takes to edit and refine a video into a workable piece the similarities between shooting video or 35mm film are there.

When I started shooting live events the similarities became even more apparent just like using film you have timed shots you need to take your time and not miss anything but your camera can only be pointed in so many directions. There is a sort of adrenaline rush knowing you have one chance to get the perfect shot. Shooting video just like film just feels more personal.

 

I now mainly shoot on a Sony a7s and a a6000 but I do carry my old AE-1 around from time to time. I still get to use the dark room at the local university.

Cameras:

Sony A7s shooting in XAVC-S or externally

Sony a6000 to XAVC-S

Canon AE-1 loaded with Illford Delta 400 usually pushed to 1600

 

Programs:

Adobe Premier Pro CC 2016

Adobe After Effects CC 2016

Local dark room using Illford RC matte paper

By Anthony Cohen

Waves of Ventura – Behind the Scenes

wavesofventura

On December 25, 2015 I flew from Bozeman, Montana to San Diego international airport. I packed light for the trip, ditching all the heavier clothing for shorts and a t-shirt in preparation for the transition from temperatures, just above zero to  those in the 60’s. Packing light allowed some room to not only bring my Sony a5100 and a few extra lenses but a small Manfrotto tripod and fluid head.

After a few days visiting with the family, my wife Amanda and I drove north towards Ventura, California where this piece was filmed. The first few scenes of the film were taken in Ventura harbor while walking along the beach. The surfers and sunset clips where shot on the last day of our stay. The airport sequence was taken before we took off from LAX to return home.

Once I returned home the data was all ingested by Justin. Time lapses where built using Adobe After Effects CC 2016 and the footage was color corrected and cut together using Adobe Premier Pro CC 2016. Justin took all the footage and weaved it into a great little piece showcasing the Waves of Ventura.

Camera used:

Software Used:

Boxes of Bozeman – Behind the Scenes

Boxesofbozeman

If you have driven around Bozeman, Montana any time in the last year in a half you have seen them… electrical boxes wrapped in the beautiful art of local artists. A few weeks ago Justin and I where driving back from a shoot over by Whitehall, MT. We where brain storming about different local projects we could do and we stumbled upon boxes. What could be better? Not only where we producing something about art that bozemanites and and people from around Gallatin valley get to experience on a daily basis but we could showcase local artists and the beautiful works they do. So Boxes of Bozeman began.

We used the Black Pocket Magic Cinema as our primary camera for this shoot. Its high dynamic range and light weight made it the perfect camera for running around in the snow around town. Being a side project we mostly captured boxes between shoots as we saw them on the side of the road. Over the course of a few weeks we got enough footage to put together this piece.

All said and told we shot about 150 gb worth of footage in RAW on the Black Magic. Using a Konova slider, four foot Indy jib and a Manfrotto fluid head we where able to capture movement and make each shot more dynamic. The Time lapse was shot at night on a Sony a6000 it was set at f/11 to keep everything crisp with a shutter speed of 1.5 sec.

Once we had enough footage Justin put it all into Adobe Premier Pro cc 2016 and Adobe After Effects cc 2016 for final editing. He used high end color correcting techniques an a modern editing style to give the video a simple yet clean feel.

Cameras used: