Part 2: What I learned from starting a Youtube channel using nothing but GoPros. by Justin Kietzman

After work one day me and my previously mentioned co-worker decided to head out to the Lower Madison River near Bozeman Montana. Armed to the teeth with every piece of fishing equipment we owned and two Go-Pro Hero 2’s, with cut up cases so I could stick Panasonic Stereo mic’s in them; which completely removes the waterproofing (I don’t understand how I never destroyed one of those cameras).

We were amped and ready to catch fish.

We got to our fishing spot at Red Mountain campground, a location we had caught many fish at before, put on the Go-Pros and hit the water with our fly rods. Not-so-luckily for us, there was a screaming drunk person on a float going past every 2 minutes, spilling beer in the water and making as much noise as possible. So after about two hours of fishing and one complete set of Go-Pro batteries, we decided to hang up the graceful touch of the fly rods and move down river to faster water and break out the spinning rods.

Once there, I realized the battery situation was more dire than I had realized. The battery on the Go-Pro I was wearing was at 50% and I only had one spare for my co-worker. So the rest of the day was nothing more than me occasionally switching on my Go-Pro when I thought I was about to catch fish, then forgetting to switch it back off, draining my battery even more. Luckily my partner that day, caught a few fish while his was running, scoring us some decent very shaky footage.

Go-Pros are the most reliable cameras on the market.

If you treat them well and follow the rules, they will work. As long as you have a fast enough memory card, you will never get a file error, especially in Protune. They can record video for constantly for the life of the battery, they will not shut off on you like most DSLR’s. The batteries run for two hours only, the primary complaint I hear about Go-Pros is the battery, these are primarily from people with little camera experience. Besides one Canon camcorder I owned, the Go-Pro has the longest single battery life of any camera I own. If you need the camera to run longer, they sell battery backpacs, or you can use an external charger, upping your time to 4-6 hours.

Next week I will talk about my editing workflow with the Go-Pro footage.

 

Stay Tuned

 

-Justin Kietzman

Transitions: Film to Digital By: Anthony Cohen

TransitionsMy first real camera was a 1980 Canon AE-1, I was 18 and in my first semester of college when I entered my first dark room. After only a week I experienced the magic of an image materializing on the page for the first time. I never looked back. Nothing is better then blasting some music chilling out and processing film after work.

If you have ever made the transition from film to digital, you lose some of the magic. Digital media is amazing; a marvel of modern technology; you get to take photos lightning fast and review them instantly. These are major bonuses but the finality of clicking the shutter is gone and photography becomes less special.

That is when I received my second real camera a Sony a5100. To be honest I bought it for its amazing video, and have moved up through the line buying a Sony a6000 and a Sony a7s.  When I first got into video production I noticed some of the old magic coming back you have that one chance to capture a moment perfectly you can try an recreate it but its never exactly the same. You might argue that its the same way with digital photography, but I feel it more when I am filming something. From the calculated and controlled click of the record button to the hours it takes to edit and refine a video into a workable piece the similarities between shooting video or 35mm film are there.

When I started shooting live events the similarities became even more apparent just like using film you have timed shots you need to take your time and not miss anything but your camera can only be pointed in so many directions. There is a sort of adrenaline rush knowing you have one chance to get the perfect shot. Shooting video just like film just feels more personal.

 

I now mainly shoot on a Sony a7s and a a6000 but I do carry my old AE-1 around from time to time. I still get to use the dark room at the local university.

Cameras:

Sony A7s shooting in XAVC-S or externally

Sony a6000 to XAVC-S

Canon AE-1 loaded with Illford Delta 400 usually pushed to 1600

 

Programs:

Adobe Premier Pro CC 2016

Adobe After Effects CC 2016

Local dark room using Illford RC matte paper

By Anthony Cohen

Bozeman Winter Farmers Market – Behind the Scenes

 

On January 30, 2016 the Bonafide Crew woke up early, still exhausted from filming a concert for a documentary the night before. Luckily today was a easier, very pleasant job that didn’t involve carrying heavy gear through the snow.

Having prepped the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema the night before, it was rigged up with the 7 inch field monitor, Zoom H4 audio recorder, Rode Shotgun Microphone, 10,000 MaH external battery and the big memory card in the belly of the camera. It was mounted on the Manfrotto 60 inch tripod with the Manfrotto fluid head. Justin would be operating this camera today.

Anthony grabbed the Sony a6000 as the B cam, which he used for wides and zoomed cutaways. Due to the a6000 having a “Custom -3 -3 -3 mode” it can come close to the soft, desaturated image of the Blackmagic.

We spent about an hour at the event, starting by filming B-Roll of the hallways upstairs, while Anthony found out where the event is actually held (downstairs to anyone wondering). Once we made it to the farmers market, I started filming wides of the crowds while Anthony did some sniper shots on ceiling lights.

After a few minutes of that, we got a bearing on who was interested in talking to the camera. Luckily Justin noticed that there was something going on with the audio as the Blackmagic was showing no active levels, so we pulled the Zoom Recorder off of the rig and set it in front of people as they spoke. This caused a very high level of room noise, but was better than nothing.

After having some very pleasant conversations with quite a few of the vendors, we decided to head out.

Once home, both of the cards were dumped to our working drive. Since the Blackmagic records to ProRes HQ and the Sony records to XAVC S, no transcoding was needed.

A little over a week later Justin started editing in Premiere Pro CC. After cutting he chose a very warm soft color scheme, that matches the feeling of being at a farmers market. Very little After Effects CC work was needed, besides some warp stabilizing.

 

Cameras Used:

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema
Sony A6000 Shooting in XAVC S

Software Used:

Premiere Pro CC
After Effects CC

 

 

Boxes of Bozeman – Behind the Scenes

Boxesofbozeman

If you have driven around Bozeman, Montana any time in the last year in a half you have seen them… electrical boxes wrapped in the beautiful art of local artists. A few weeks ago Justin and I where driving back from a shoot over by Whitehall, MT. We where brain storming about different local projects we could do and we stumbled upon boxes. What could be better? Not only where we producing something about art that bozemanites and and people from around Gallatin valley get to experience on a daily basis but we could showcase local artists and the beautiful works they do. So Boxes of Bozeman began.

We used the Black Pocket Magic Cinema as our primary camera for this shoot. Its high dynamic range and light weight made it the perfect camera for running around in the snow around town. Being a side project we mostly captured boxes between shoots as we saw them on the side of the road. Over the course of a few weeks we got enough footage to put together this piece.

All said and told we shot about 150 gb worth of footage in RAW on the Black Magic. Using a Konova slider, four foot Indy jib and a Manfrotto fluid head we where able to capture movement and make each shot more dynamic. The Time lapse was shot at night on a Sony a6000 it was set at f/11 to keep everything crisp with a shutter speed of 1.5 sec.

Once we had enough footage Justin put it all into Adobe Premier Pro cc 2016 and Adobe After Effects cc 2016 for final editing. He used high end color correcting techniques an a modern editing style to give the video a simple yet clean feel.

Cameras used:

 

Leftovers – Behind the Scenes

Leftovers

Leftovers was a pet project of Justin Kietzman. As 2015 started to wind down Bonafide Film House found that we had a huge collection of time lapse shot from over the past year shot with a variety of cameras. These time lapses while all decent each have a small flaw in some way, They may have been bumped or something unusual happened in frame. For one reason or another these pieces where not used in our final projects.

Justin took these and ran with them using a his creative flair he was able to piece together a final product that shows the power of a time lapse. The completed film was edited using a variety of productions suites including Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2016, Adobe After Affects CC 2016 and Go Pro studio.

These time lapses where shot on a variety of different camera’s including:

Filming Locations:

  • Bozeman Montana
  • Ventura California
  • San Diego California
  • Sarasota Florida