Transitions: Film to Digital By: Anthony Cohen

TransitionsMy first real camera was a 1980 Canon AE-1, I was 18 and in my first semester of college when I entered my first dark room. After only a week I experienced the magic of an image materializing on the page for the first time. I never looked back. Nothing is better then blasting some music chilling out and processing film after work.

If you have ever made the transition from film to digital, you lose some of the magic. Digital media is amazing; a marvel of modern technology; you get to take photos lightning fast and review them instantly. These are major bonuses but the finality of clicking the shutter is gone and photography becomes less special.

That is when I received my second real camera a Sony a5100. To be honest I bought it for its amazing video, and have moved up through the line buying a Sony a6000 and a Sony a7s.  When I first got into video production I noticed some of the old magic coming back you have that one chance to capture a moment perfectly you can try an recreate it but its never exactly the same. You might argue that its the same way with digital photography, but I feel it more when I am filming something. From the calculated and controlled click of the record button to the hours it takes to edit and refine a video into a workable piece the similarities between shooting video or 35mm film are there.

When I started shooting live events the similarities became even more apparent just like using film you have timed shots you need to take your time and not miss anything but your camera can only be pointed in so many directions. There is a sort of adrenaline rush knowing you have one chance to get the perfect shot. Shooting video just like film just feels more personal.

 

I now mainly shoot on a Sony a7s and a a6000 but I do carry my old AE-1 around from time to time. I still get to use the dark room at the local university.

Cameras:

Sony A7s shooting in XAVC-S or externally

Sony a6000 to XAVC-S

Canon AE-1 loaded with Illford Delta 400 usually pushed to 1600

 

Programs:

Adobe Premier Pro CC 2016

Adobe After Effects CC 2016

Local dark room using Illford RC matte paper

By Anthony Cohen

Bozeman Winter Farmers Market – Behind the Scenes

 

On January 30, 2016 the Bonafide Crew woke up early, still exhausted from filming a concert for a documentary the night before. Luckily today was a easier, very pleasant job that didn’t involve carrying heavy gear through the snow.

Having prepped the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema the night before, it was rigged up with the 7 inch field monitor, Zoom H4 audio recorder, Rode Shotgun Microphone, 10,000 MaH external battery and the big memory card in the belly of the camera. It was mounted on the Manfrotto 60 inch tripod with the Manfrotto fluid head. Justin would be operating this camera today.

Anthony grabbed the Sony a6000 as the B cam, which he used for wides and zoomed cutaways. Due to the a6000 having a “Custom -3 -3 -3 mode” it can come close to the soft, desaturated image of the Blackmagic.

We spent about an hour at the event, starting by filming B-Roll of the hallways upstairs, while Anthony found out where the event is actually held (downstairs to anyone wondering). Once we made it to the farmers market, I started filming wides of the crowds while Anthony did some sniper shots on ceiling lights.

After a few minutes of that, we got a bearing on who was interested in talking to the camera. Luckily Justin noticed that there was something going on with the audio as the Blackmagic was showing no active levels, so we pulled the Zoom Recorder off of the rig and set it in front of people as they spoke. This caused a very high level of room noise, but was better than nothing.

After having some very pleasant conversations with quite a few of the vendors, we decided to head out.

Once home, both of the cards were dumped to our working drive. Since the Blackmagic records to ProRes HQ and the Sony records to XAVC S, no transcoding was needed.

A little over a week later Justin started editing in Premiere Pro CC. After cutting he chose a very warm soft color scheme, that matches the feeling of being at a farmers market. Very little After Effects CC work was needed, besides some warp stabilizing.

 

Cameras Used:

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema
Sony A6000 Shooting in XAVC S

Software Used:

Premiere Pro CC
After Effects CC

 

 

Tom Catmull “Addiction” – Behind the Scenes

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Hailing from Missoula, Montana Tom Catmull was scheduled to play at Norris Hot Springs on January 31st, 2016. The Bonafide Film House crew packed up the production van and headed south towards Ennis, MT to capture his performance in the best quality possible. Heading out from our studio near main street Bozeman, Montana we made good time to Norris. Arriving an hour and a half early put us there at magic hour allowing us to capture the stunning sun set as it slid behind the tobacco root range.

After meeting with Mr. Catmull the crew quickly unloaded and assembled the equipment. Due to the unusual shooting conditions at Norris Hot Springs we chose to shoot a 3 camera set up. We used the Black Magic Cinema as our primary camera set up as a wide angle of the stage built within a geodesic dome. Our two B cameras where set up within the dome. The GH3 getting a 3/4 shot of Tom playing at his chair and the Sony a6000 rigged up with the field monitor on a shoulder rig to get close ups and more dynamic angles.

Once the performance started, Anthony used the shoulder rig within the dome stage, while Justin manned the Black Magic, Lumix and made sure the audio was on point. At the end of the night with over 200 Gb of raw data and some amazing shots using only the stage’s preset lighting we headed back to the studio.

Justin Kietzman handled all the post processing. He finished all data ingestion the night of the performance and then edited all the footage a couple days later using Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2016 And  Adobe After Affects CC 2016. The entire project was completed within 4 business days.

 

 Camera’s used on this shoot:

Software used for post production: